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Convert a scientific notation to decimal number, and still keeping the data format as float64


On 10/18/19 8:52 AM, doganadres at gmail.com wrote:
> On Friday, October 18, 2019 at 2:46:42 PM UTC+3, Gys wrote:
>> On 10/18/19 10:35 AM, doganadres at gmail.com wrote:
>>> Here is my question:
>>>
>>>
>>> I am using the numpy.std formula to calculate the standart deviation. However, the result comes as a number in scientific notation.
>>> Therefore I am asking, How to convert a scientific notation to decimal number, and still keep the data format as float64 ?
>>>
>>> Or is there any workaround to get the initial standart deviation result as a decimal number?
>>>
>>>
>>> Here is my code:
>>>
>>> stdev=numpy.std(dataset)
>>> print(stdev)
>>>      Result: 4.999999999999449e-05
>>>
>>>
>>> print(stdev.dtype)
>>>      Result: float64
>>>
>>>
>>> Solutions such as this:
>>>
>>> stdev=format(stdev, '.10f')
>>> converts the data into a string object! which I don't want.
>>>
>>>
>>> Expected result: I am willing to have a result as a decimal number in a float64 format.
>>>
>>> System: (Python 3.7.4 running on Win10)
>>>
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>>
>> Hi, doganadres at gmail.com
>>
>> why don't you use
>>
>> print("{0:10.5f}".format(x))
>>
>> The only thing you want is a specific form of the human readable 
>> representation of the number. For this it is not necessary the convert 
>> the  *number* itself definitely to a string. You only have to make a 
>> temp copy of x for printing purposes.
>>
>> Linux Mint Tara in Spyder(Python 3.6) :
>>
>> x=4.999999999999449e-05
>>
>> print(x)
>> 4.999999999999449e-05
>>
>> print("{0:8.5f}".format(x))
>>   0.00005
>>
>> print(x)
>> 4.999999999999449e-05
>>
>> hth
>> Gys
> Hello,
>
> I don't only need a human readable representation of number, I need to use it further, do things such as putting it in a pandas object and saving it to an excel file.
>
> Doing things such as 
> x="{0:10.5f}".format(x)
> gives a str object as a result:
> <built-in method format of str object at 0x07F84A48>

If you are going to use it further as a floating point binary number,
why do you need to do ANYTHING to it. As I said, the exponential format
is just a string representation of the binary value (just like the
0.0005 is).

If you put it into something that stores the float64 representation,
that doesn't have anything like an exponential vs decimal format.
(Depending on how you put it into excel, that may actually use a string
representation if something like a CSV file.)

-- 
Richard Damon